FACES FOR HUMAN RIGHTS BY ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL, M.D.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

In 1990, Dr. Wilma Bulkin Siegel retired and concluded a distinguished career as a leading oncologist in New York City. Renowned for her pioneering efforts, she established one of the earliest hospices in New York State, demonstrating a commitment to providing access to AIDS patients. Dr. Siegel's unwavering dedication to blending art with medicine has been a consistent theme throughout her professional journey.

Post-retirement, Dr. Siegel immersed herself in her passion for watercolor painting, specializing in portraiture and social realism. Her national acclaim grew with a notable series of portraits featuring individuals living with AIDS. Beyond this, she has painted impactful collections such as Holocaust Survivors and Liberators, Returning Veterans, Muslim Women in America, and Children of the Modern Family.

"I have always felt that education is the way to change the world for the better." Wilma

Recognizing her significant contributions in Art and Medicine, Dr. Siegel was bestowed with the prestigious "Janice Palmer Award of the Society of Arts in Healthcare," the highest honor within the healthcare arts sector.

In 2023 Artist Wilma Bulkin Siegel M.D. was awarded the prestigious Human Rights Friendly Award. ISHR’s Friendly awards recognizes and celebrates outstanding contributions in the promotion of Human Rights Education, in line with the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The ceremony is held every five years on December 10th, which marks International Human Rights Day.

"The Faces for Human Rights" exhibition represents a compelling artistic-educational initiative that transcends borders in its celebration of the essence of human rights. It stands as a testament to the collaborative spirit of International Solidarity for Human Rights and Dr. Wilma Bulkin Siegel. Within this project, individuals, professionals, and human rights advocates from around the world have generously contributed their time and thoughts to Dr. Wilma Bulkin Siegel and International Solidarity for Human Rights and they collective portray the thirty articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights through their own personas and thoughts.

Each of the 30 portraits symbolizes one of the 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, thus creating a poignant connection between the subjects and the principles they represent. This unique approach ensures that the project not only pays homage to the document but also brings it to life through art.

It prompts us to recognize the incredible diversity and strength of the individuals who have championed these rights and the ongoing work required to ensure their universal application.

We wish "The Faces for Human Rights" serve as an educational tool and tribute to the past and a beacon of hope for the future, reminding us that the struggle for human rights is ongoing, and that each of us can play a vital role in advancing this noble cause.

FACES FOR HUMAN RIGHTS THE PORTRAITS

Article 1 UDHR: We are all born free and equal.

"I do pause every time and reflect on Article 1 as the stage setter for the articles that follow. All humans are created equal, the product of a common origin, and a common evolutionary path." Orlando Figueroa

Orlando Figueroa (Puerto Rico-USA) represents article 1: Mechanical Engineering, Scientist. Senior Executive and Expert Aerospace Consultant. Former NASA senior executive with 33 years of experience. He served as the Director of NASA's Mars Exploration Program. During his tenure, he oversaw the development and execution of several successful Mars missions, including the Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter missions. NASA announced this year that Orlando Figueroa, once NASA’s “Mars Czar,” will chair the second independent review of the Mars Sample Return mission planned for launch later this decade. Figueroa was honored with an Honorary Doctor's Degree and received several notable awards, including the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal (1993), the Community Stars Award from the Maryland Science Commission (1994), the Presidential Rank Award for Outstanding Performance as a Senior Executive (2001), and the Pioneer Award (2002).

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH ORLANDO:

I met Orlando Figueroa on Facetime interview. He has been appointed by NASA as” Mars Czar” to chair the second independent review of the Mars Sample Return to Earth for analysis. He was the “Mars Czar” previously for Mars exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity were developed and then retired to become Director for Science and Technology at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. He is always questioning where we come from and the beginnings of the Universe. The basic question in itself “levels the playing field of equality”. He states the human exploration into space is a magnificent expression of Human intelligence. The James Webb telescope has now taken us closer to “the Big Bang” and the origin of the universe. At this time, he is rereading the Bible.

Audio narration: Orlando Figueroa, thoughts about Article 1 UDHR.

Text: Orlando Figueroa, thoughts about Article 1 UDHR.

All the human rights articles carry an incredibly important, powerful, and common message. A message of unity and respect for who we are, our place in the planet we inhabit, and the universe around us. I don’t pick favorites, but I do pause every time and reflect on Article 1 as the stage setter for the articles that follow. All humans are created equal, the product of a common origin, and a common evolutionary path. We yearn to explain, find meaning, and learn from and the world around us. And, by world I do not mean to limit it to our neighborhood, country, or the planet we inhabit. When I was growing up the news were dominated by the Vietnam War, social unrest, and despair in many countries. But there were also many uplifting and inspirational stories and news. From a very young age, and thanks to loving and committed parents I yearned to learn from and to respect the world around me and to respect others. I was driven to learn more, to ask endless and often unanswerable questions at the time. NASA’s Apollo Program became a huge source of worldwide inspiration, with news that had me glued to the television every time they were on. I dreamt of learning about space, inspired by what I was seeing, especially when astronauts landed on the Moon against the deep dark background of space. I am certain that I was not the only one dreaming at the time nor am I the only one today. What does that have anything to do with Article 1, you may ask? I have experienced firsthand what it means to have opportunities, to be respected, to be acknowledged, to be loved; and to be able to reciprocate. The more I learn about the vastness of the Universe, its beginnings, and our place in it, the more I sit in awe at such marvelous creation. I dedicate a fair amount of my time to share what I learn and my life experiences with the public, with students of all ages from many parts of the world, and often with their parents and neighbors. The demographics have changed over the years to encompass many countries, many races, many beliefs, many physical and mental abilities, and many interests. Beyond the basic needs for food, water, shelter, and security that we often take for granted, there is this deep need for human contact and connection that comes from being free and equal in dignity and rights. The courage, aspirations, and commitment behind the many stories in the fight to protect those rights are a source of great inspiration to me. I may not live long enough to learn or find all the answers, but the journey has been worthwhile. Sustaining the remarkable progress achieved thanks to the sacrifice and commitment of many is existential.

Article 2 UDHR: We have the right to freedom from discrimination.

"I emphasize the importance of valuing ethnic and cultural diversity, advocating for mutual respect, inclusion and equity in all areas of life." Angelica Dass

Angelica Dass (Brazil) represents article 2. Angélica Dass is an award-winning photographer born in Brazil and based in Spain. Her practice combines photography with sociological research and public participation in global defense of human rights. She is the creator of the internationally acclaimed Humanæ project—a collection of portraits that reveal the diverse beauty of humanity. Her work has traveled to over 50 cities around the world. The project attempts to document humanity's true colors by avoiding false labels such as white, red, black and yellow often associated with race. In 2016, her career launched into new dimensions thanks to her participation in the TED Global Talks. Her TED Talk exceed two million views confirming the great potential of her work which actually goes beyond photography and becomes a tool for social change that promotes dialogue and challenges cultural prejudices.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH ANGELICA:

Angelica Dass is a Brazilian photographer known for her project "Humanae." Born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She is living in Spain with her significant other who is a compassionate partner. Dass studied at the "Universidade Católica de Salvador" and later earned a master's degree in photography from the EFTI School in Madrid, Spain. The "Humanae" project is a photographic endeavor that seeks to challenge traditional ideas of race and identity by exploring the diverse spectrum of human skin tones. Dass aims to demonstrate that skin color is not limited to a handful of predefined categories but is instead a vast continuum of individuality and uniqueness. To create the project, Dass takes a portrait of an individual and extracts an 11x11 pixel sample from their face. She then matches the sample to the Pantone color system, assigning a specific Pantone code to each participant. The resulting portraits are displayed in grids or sequences, showcasing the incredible range of human skin tones. The project has gained international recognition and has been exhibited in various galleries and museums worldwide. It aims to promote discussions about race, identity, and diversity, challenging preconceived notions and encouraging viewers to reflect on their own perceptions of skin color and its significance. I met her and interviewed her on a WhatsApp call.

Audio narration: Angelica Dass, thoughts about Article 2 UDHR.

Text: Angelica Dass, thoughts about Article 2 UDHR.

"Article 2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is fundamental to my artistic work and activism. It establishes the principle of equality and non-discrimination, recognizing that all human beings have the same rights and freedoms, regardless of their personal condition. Through photography and education, I promote equality and non-discrimination. I emphasize the importance of valuing ethnic and cultural diversity, advocating for mutual respect, inclusion and equity in all areas of life. My work focuses on exploring issues of identity and discrimination. Projects such as "Humanae" highlight skin tone diversity to challenge preconceived norms and promote acceptance of human diversity. This declaration urges us to overcome prejudice and stereotypes; recognize the inherent equality of all human beings and reject discrimination, fostering inclusive and diverse societies where individual differences are respected. Through creativity, we can foster dialogue, understanding and empathy between different social groups, promoting mutual acceptance and recognition of our shared humanity and promoting fair representation of all people. As activators in our society, we use our voices and works to denounce injustices and fight for social change to ensure equal rights for all.Article 2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides us with an ethical and legal framework to promote equality, challenge prejudice and contribute to building fairer and more inclusive societies. It is essential to our work as artists.

Article 3 UDH: We have the right to life, liberty and security of person.

"To live life to the fullest, we need a protective environment and a loving family that provides us with care when necessary." Montserrat Fernández Álvarez

Montserrat Fernández Álvarez (Spain) represents article 3. Montserrat holds multiple roles at Dulce Nombre de Jesús School (Oviedo, Asturias), including teacher, guidance counselor, and coordinator of the Guidance Department. With degrees in Educational Sciences, Speech Therapy, and Neuropsychology, she has extensive experience in education and language development, and is an honorary collaborator of the Psychology Department at the University of Oviedo.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH MOSERRAT:

Montserrat Fernandez is a teacher in the Dulce Nombre de Jesus School, in the region of Asturias, Spain. She is the daughter of a well-known and respected businessman, Mr. Vidal Fernández, from the city of Grado. Mr. Fernandez purchased a historical 19th-century mansion in the village and restored it to its original state in order to preserve the town's historical heritage. The mansion is situated on the Camino Primitivo, the original route of the Way of Saint James, one of the most significant pilgrimages in the world. While grieving her father's terminal illness from Alzheimer's disease, Montserrat Fernandez oversees the mansion. Additionally, one of the plaques along the Route to Human Rights on the Camino Primitivo represents Article 3: "Everyone has the right to life, liberty, and security of person."

Audio narration: Montserrat Fernández, thoughts about Article 3 UDHR.

Text: Montserrat Fernández Álvarez, thoughts about Article 3 UDHR.

When I was included in this wonderful project, I felt genuinely honored to be part of a group of people committed to the promotion and dissemination of human rights. I see it as an immense gift that my name and my face will be linked to the right to life. Since all of these rights are inalienable, I believe that the origin and purpose of all human rights lie precisely in the right to life. Life, that gift that is granted to us miraculously and almost inexplicably, is something we must be thankful for, celebrate, nurture, and protect from its very beginning. From this right stem all other rights, we strive for a full, free, dignified life, free from restraints, discrimination, or privileges, a life that is just and characterized by equality for all human beings without exception. Human rights seek to ensure the best conditions for life because living to the fullest means being able to express ourselves freely, to gather and raise our voices, to be heard and accepted, to decide and actively participate in a community, to have the opportunity to learn, receive an education, work, and develop our potential, and also to enjoy well-deserved rest. To live life to the fullest, we need a protective environment and a loving family that provides us with care when necessary. The underlying theme of this wonderful narrative is always life. Defending the right to life implies being alive and living for others, ensuring that we move towards the path of the best possible world with our strengths and weaknesses, and that, despite everything, life persists even in the harshest conditions.

Article 4 UDHR: We have the right to freedom from slavery.

"I aim to show the world the ugly truth of child slavery hidden behind our sweet treats." Miki Mistrati

Miki Mistrati (Denmark) represents article 4. He is a Danish Writer, Journalist and, Multi-Award-Winning Filmmaker (12 awards 36 nominations). Director of three international documentaries, "The Dark Side of Chocolate," "Shady Chocolate", and "The Chocolate War," which have been broadcast in over 35 countries exposing brutal trafficking and illegal child labor in the multi-billion-dollar chocolate industry. Documentary maker Miki Mistrati wants consumers to know the truth about chocolate. His latest award was the AIB Awards 2020, and he also received a Special Mention in Rory Peck Trust 2020.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH MIKI:

Miki Mistrati is a Danish journalist, lawyer and writer who has investigated the use of child labor and trafficked children in chocolate production, where the children, ranging in age from 10 to 15, are forced to do hard and often hazardous labor, are often beaten, and according to the film's narrator most are never paid. He is the award-winning director of three international documentaries exposing brutal trafficking and illegal child labor in the multi-billion-dollar chocolate industry: The Chocolate War, The Shady Chocolate Business, and The Dark Side of Chocolate. 70 % percentage of cocoa that is consumed in the world comes from West Africa. Miki described to us how cocoa continues to be harvested by child slaves on a massive scale in spite of decades-old promises by the biggest names in the industry to put a stop to the practice and ensure the chocolate we enjoy comes from ethically sourced alternatives. During our conversation he manifested that he has had life threats from investigating this issue. He represents Article 4 “I have the right to freedom from slavery.”

Audio narration: Miki Mistrati, thoughts about Article 4 UDHR.

Text: Miki Mistrati, thoughts about Article 4 UDHR.

Article 4, to me, is like the solid beating heart of freedom, a powerful reminder that everyone should be able to choose their own path in life, free from chains. My whole reason for doing what I do is to ensure no child loses their childhood and no person loses their self-respect because they are forced to work in terrible conditions. Even though we all love chocolate, there's a dark side to it that I've promised to expose. I aim to show the world the ugly truth of child slavery hidden behind our sweet treats. Article 4 is more than just words written down; it's like a blazing song of freedom, a light guiding us to do what's right. Through my work, I'm committed to making freedom a real thing, turning the words of this article into actions and making these rights something people can really experience. Every day, I work to shine a light on these issues to fight against the terrible treatment of children. I'm determined to make sure that Article 4 is not just a far-off dream, but becomes a reality for every child, a clear sign of our victory over slavery, of our love for people over our indifference to their suffering.

Article 5 UDHR: We have the right to freedom from torture.

Combatting the crime of torture, whether physical, psychological, or otherwise, Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment, has become my life's mission for many years. Tamara Sujú Roa

Tamara Sujú Roa (Venezuela) represents article 5. She is a Venezuelan criminal lawyer and human rights activist. Executive Director & CEO of The CASLA Institute a center for research and analysis in matters related to the defense of democracy, the rule of law and human rights in Latin America. Sujú has recompiled torture cases registered in Venezuela between 2002 and 2014 and formalized a demand against Nicolas Maduro in the International Criminal Court in July 2016.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL CONVERSATION WITH TAMARA:

I met Tamara Sujú on a Whats-App video call. She does not speak English, so Elizabeth and Devorah translated for me. She is a Venezuelan criminal lawyer and human rights activist living in exile in Spain. She is currently the Executive Director and CEO of the CASLA Institute, which promotes human rights and provides legal support to political prisoners in Latin-American countries. She is the author of the largest archive of torture, sexual violence and arbitrary detention cases in Venezuela. In recent years Sujú has collected first-hand testimonials from more than 400 victims of violations carried out by the Venezuelan government, concluding that such acts were not sporadic but rather systematic and widespread. In August 2014, she sought asylum in Czech Republic as suggested by President Havel of Czech Republic. She has succeeded in getting the International Criminal Court in Holland to investigate the Venezuelan regime for crimes against humanity. She is training her daughter, who is also a lawyer, to continue her mission.

Audio narration: Tamara Sujú, thoughts about Article 4 UDHR.

Text: Tamara Sujú, thoughts about Article 4 UDHR.

No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment. Combatting the crime of torture, whether physical, psychological, or otherwise, Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment, has become my life's mission for many years. I consider it the worst punishment or penalty to which a human being can be subjected, and along with it, their family circle also suffers the consequences. It can be executed under the permissibility of states as determined by their legislation against minority groups, gender, religious groups, or children, in states where the Rule of Law does not exist, in countries at war executed against civilian society or prisoners of war, or in states where there are criminal or terrorist groups that are not controlled by said state or act with its tolerance. These crimes are committed against defenseless or completely subdued individuals, those who cannot protect themselves, who are degraded to such an extent that they lose control of their own bodies, to cause them pain and suffering, to exemplify punishments, or to obtain testimonies whose traces are hardly forgettable and overcome in a world where the pain and suffering of individuals and groups subjected to these crimes are promptly forgotten by the majority without receiving the comprehensive attention they need. Working to provide alerts that help prevent this crime, seeking solutions so that human beings do not have to experience such pain and suffering, should be a priority for all states that are part of the United Nations System and Universal and Regional Bodies. In most cases, these entities react slowly and, in many cases, without coercive power to prevent them from continuing to occur. 75 years have passed since the Proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and torture, cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment still persist in countries that claim to be democratic. Let us all work for "Never Again"!

Article 6 of the UDHR: we have the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Jose Antonio Vargas (Philippines) Represents Article 6. A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and Tony-nominated producer. Born in the Philippines and raised in the United States from the age of twelve. Vargas learned at 16 he was undocumented. At the top of his career as a journalist, he risked everything by going public with his truth. Vargas is now an advocate and a leading voice for the human rights of immigrants. He founded the non-profit media advocacy organization Define American, named one of the World's Most Innovative Companies by Fast Company.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL CONVERSATION WITH JOSE:

I interviewed José Antonio Vargas, on iPhone. Jose Antonio is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and Tony-nominated producer. A leading voice for the human rights of immigrants, he founded the non-profit media advocacy organization Define American, named one of the World's Most Innovative Companies by Fast Company. He also serves on the advisory board of TheDream.US. Vargas was born in the Philippines. In 1993, when Vargas was twelve, his mother sent him to live with his grandparents in the U.S. without obtaining authorization for him to stay in the country permanently; his grandparents were naturalized U.S. citizens. In California, he attended Crittenden Middle School and Mountain View High School. He did not learn of his immigration status until 1997 when, at age 16, he attempted to obtain a California driver's license with identity documents provided by his family that he then discovered were fraudulent. He kept his immigration status secret, pursuing his education and fitting in as an American with the help of friends and teachers. Vargas is widely recognized for his active involvement in advocating for the rights of undocumented immigrants in the United States, including his support for the Dream Act (The Development Relief Education Alien Minors Act). Furthermore, he exemplifies the principles outlined in Article 6, which asserts the fundamental right to be acknowledged as a person before the law, regardless of nationality or immigration status.

Article 7 of the UDHR: we have the right to have equal protection before the law.

"The right to equality not only demands the best in all of us, but also requires our utmost respect for others different than ourselves in any way." Carlos Sardi

Carlos E. Sardi (USA-Venezuela) represents article 7. Lawyer, Founding Partner at Sardi Law PLLC. Sardi practices in the areas of complex commercial litigation, bankruptcy, creditors' rights, insolvency, reorganization and restructuring. Carlos E. Sardi has been elected President of the Bankruptcy Bar Association of the Southern District of Florida and will serve as President for the 2023-24 term. Carlos Sardi has earned the respect of peers as one of the top-rated attorneys in the nation.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH CARLOS:

Carlos Sardi was born and raised in Venezuela, is a Lawyer specialized in the areas of bankruptcy. He is active in professional organizations such as the American Bankruptcy Institute, INSOL International, American Bar Association, Dade County Bar Association, Cuban American Bar Association, Put Something Back Program of Miami-Dade County, and the Bankruptcy Bar Association for the Southern District of Florida. He has also served in the Bankruptcy Committee of the Dade County Bar Association. Recognized as a "Rising Star" by the Florida Super Lawyers magazine and Florida's Elite by Florida. He also serves as an adjunct professor at Barry University teaching a course in bankruptcy law. After arriving in the United States, he faced the challenge of adapting to a new language during high school. Despite this, he consistently excelled and achieved the top position in his class. During his time in high school, he met his life partner, with whom he is still happily married, and they have four daughters. Initially, he pursued finance studies at the University of Miami to join his father's business. However, as his family grew to include four children, he developed a strong desire to study law. Consequently, his father bought out their partnership, allowing him to attend law school at NOVA University, where he graduated with honors. Experiencing a midlife crisis after the passing of his mother, he made the decision to quit his legal practice and embark on the Camino to Santiago Compostela pilgrimage. Returning from his journey, he established a successful bankruptcy law practice, where he consistently excels and often takes on pro bono cases. Through his work, he upholds the principles of Article 7, which affirms the right to equal protection under the law.

Video narration: Carlos Sardi, thoughts about Article 7 UDHR.

Text: Carlos Sardi, thoughts about Article 7 UDHR.

The principles of equality are very important, particularly to me as an active advocate for the rule of law. It is at the heart of human rights in every aspect of our lives – socially, civilly, politically, economically, and legally. Part of the foundation of a just society is to blindly provide equal treatment of everyone before the law without regard to a person’s race, color, ethnicity, national origin, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, financial status, or any other characteristic, quality, or status of a person. As aptly put by Francis Wright, the Scottish-born American social reformer, “Equality is the soul of liberty; there is, in fact, no liberty without it.” I wholeheartedly agree with that saying. The right to equality not only demands the best in all of us, but also requires our utmost respect for others different than ourselves in any way – that is, it requires us to embrace our own diversity and, at the same time, demands from us the humane treatment of other persons as our equals without any kind of discrimination or bias towards them. Equality is really nothing more than our empathy and solidarity for others and our basic understanding that, as humans, our only way to live together in harmony as God intends us to do, is to always work together for the common good of all of us without distinction. This is my creed.

Article 8 of the UDHR: We have the right to justice.

"However, we must be diligent in our pursuit of freedom, justice, dignity, grace, and liberty for every human being on the planet." Selena Resspas

Selena M. Respass (USA) represents article 8. Professor at Miami Dade College, School of Justice, Public Safety & Law Studies. Professor Respass is a consultant who provides program development and training addressing Violence Prevention issues such as Human Trafficking, Human USA Rights, Sexual Assault Awareness, Domestic and Dating Violence, Bullying and Cyberbullying, and Gun Violence.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH SELENA:

Selena is pursuing her doctoral degree at the University of Phoenix in Education Leadership and Education Technology Doctoral Program; her concentration is infused with criminal justice education. She attended Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, where she received both her bachelor’s (Criminal Justice/Education) and master’s (Criminal Justice/Administration and Planning) degrees. She has been facilitating/teaching students for more than 25 years. In addition, students enrolled in her courses are required to create Adobe Spark or Prezi projects regarding both human rights and human trafficking. She has been involved with the Miami Dade College (MDC) and School of Justice Violence Prevention Initiative “Increase the Peace” for more than 10 years. This initiative provides students with violence prevention information through speaker series, classroom instruction, service learning, and peer leadership training. Currently, she serves as cochair on the MDC, North Campus Route to Human Rights Committee; is an advisor to the MDC, School of Justice, Justice Student Organization; and is co-advisor to the Forensic Science Crime Scene Investigation Student Organization. I met Selena on the North Campus about 6 years ago as adjunct professor in the beginning of her career at Miami Dade College and signed a poster of my work which she honored by putting on her living room wall at her home. Now she is an Associate Professor and leader of the major Human Rights Classes at Miami Dade College having learned from Devorah and Elizabeth and so honored that she is a part of this project.

Video narration: Selena Respass, thoughts about Article 8 UDHR.

Text: Selena Respass, thoughts about Article 8 UDHR.

This Article pertains to every human being on the planet having the right to fair and legal representation when facing litigation that may take away their freedoms. Personally, my position as an Associate Professor at the Miami Dade College, School of Justice, Public Safety Management & Law Studies allows me the opportunity to explore the United States Constitution and the Laws associated with legal legislation that has been passed in the United States Congress and upheld by the United States Supreme Court protecting the rights of United State citizens. I am aware however that other nations in the world do not have the freedoms or opportunity to experience the rights that Americans have died and fought for 245 years to maintain. However, we must be diligent in our pursuit of freedom, justice, dignity, grace, and liberty for every human being on the planet. As citizens of the world, we must understand that everyone's life on this planet is sacred and must be respected no matter, race, color, creed, religion, sexual orientation, or political affiliation. “May Peace Always Be Still for the World”.

Article 9 of the UDHR: We shall not be subjected to arbitrary arrest detention or exile.

"As human beings, every day, we make decisions on where to sit, settle, nest...live." Unity Dow

Dr. Unity Dow (Botswana-Southern Africa) represents article 9. Unity is a Botswana lawyer, human rights activist, specially elected member of parliament, and a writer. She was the first woman to serve on Botswana’s High Court. She served as Minister of Basic Education, Minister of Infrastructure and Housing Development, and Minister of International Affairs & Cooperation. She has served on numerous international commissions and committees, evaluating the application of laws affecting the human rights of people in Kenya, Palestine, Rwanda and Sierra Leone. She has received numerous accolades and honors for her humanitarian work, including the Legion of Honour in 2010. Thanks to a lawsuit she initiated in the 1990s, Botswana women were granted the right to pass on their nationality to their children.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH UNITY:

I had the pleasure of speaking with Unity Dow over the telephone, she was in Botswana. She holds the distinction of being the first woman to serve as a judge on the High Court of Botswana. Her journey to this esteemed position began when President Khama nominated her to the parliament. Subsequently, she assumed roles in various key ministries, including Basic Education, Infrastructure and Housing Development, and International Affairs and Cooperation. Unity Dow's background is rooted in humble beginnings, with her parents working as a seamstress and a farmer. They placed great value on education and, in tribute to the UN declaration of the first African country's independence, named her Unity. This name was chosen to symbolize the "new dawn of the people of Africa," a sentiment that resonates with the inception of UNICEF. Her pursuit of knowledge led her to earn her law degree in 1983 from the University of Botswana and Swaziland, followed by further studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her exceptional achievements have garnered recognition on a global scale, including the prestigious Legion of Honor, highlighting her outstanding contributions to gender equality. Beyond her legal and governmental roles, Unity Dow has shown a deep commitment to addressing the pressing issue of HIV/AIDS, particularly relevant in a country like Botswana, where the prevalence of this disease was notably high. She has even taken steps to establish a school with a profound mission centered around the "3 C's": Courage to engage in acts of goodwill, Creativity to share innovative visions, and Community to propagate courage and vision throughout society.

Video narration: Unity Dow, thoughts about Article 9 UDHR.

Text: Unity Dow, thoughts about Article 9 UDHR.

As human beings, every day, we make decisions on where to sit, settle, nest...live. You get unsettled when you return from the bathroom to find that someone is sitting on your chair, even when there are other chairs available for you to sit. Why? Because the right to your chosen place in the world is so fundamental that even in its small undermining, as when your seat is taken, you are shaken and disoriented. You feel an injustice at being displaced. Now imagine being taken into custody or being denied access to your home. Detention centers are not famous for their comfort, but it would not matter if the detention accommodations were palatial. Governments that are in the habit of exiling their citizens cannot, generally, boast of great living conditions, but it would not matter if the streets of the country to which you are exiled are paved in gold. At the core of this principle is that you will not be removed from where you have chosen to sit, walk, settle, nest, make a home, work, without compliance with legal processes and without legal justification.

Art 10 of the UDHR: we are entitled to a fair and public hearing.

"The right of defense stands as one of the defining elements of our progress as human beings and represents the main manifestation of the right to effective judicial protection." Ulises Bértolo

Ulises Bértolo García (Spain) represents article 10. He is a Lawyer, Professor and Writer. Director of BÉRTOLO Lawyers. He is a full member of the Academia Xacobea. He has published several novels that critics and readers have well received. Bértolo dedicates part of his https://www.bermorabogados.com/home.html time to various non-profit endeavors, particularly those that promote sports and culture.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH ULISES:

Ulises Bértolo is a seasoned Spanish lawyer, renowned for his extensive expertise in providing specialized legal counsel to both public and private entities, covering a wide spectrum of areas such as trade, intermediation, and foreign trade guidance. His career has been marked by his effective representation in legal and arbitral proceedings on behalf of administrations and companies, often in high-profile cases that attract significant media attention. Currently, he holds the position of Director at BÉRTOLO Lawyers and also serves as a Counselor at the International Institute of Applied Criminology. In this capacity, he plays a pivotal role in organizing the International Congress of Criminology in collaboration with the Xunta de Galicia and the Galician Academy of Public Security. My introduction to Ulises Bertolo took place during a trip to Spain, where we were working alongside Elizabeth and Devorah on the inauguration of the Route to Human Rights in partnership with the Jacobian Society in Santiago Compostela. In addition to his legal prowess, Ulises Bertolo is a remarkable and accomplished writer. He is dedicated to promoting stories that revolve around resilient and intriguing women with compelling narratives. His novels have achieved remarkable success, with his latest work titled "The Lady from the North," delving into the truth behind Spain's most prominent drug trafficker.

Video narration: Ulices Bértolo García, thoughts about Article 10 UDHR.

Text: Ulices Bértolo García, thoughts about Article 10 USHR.

One of the great advances of our civilization consisted in overcoming the harshness and arbitrariness of justice dispensed by the ruling classes. This achievement was realized through the extension of the right of suffrage, allowing a significant part of the citizenry to participate in the drafting of laws and introduce a more rational system of justice.The right of defense stands as one of the defining elements of our progress as human beings and represents the main manifestation of the right to effective judicial protection. Its primary objective is to shield any citizen immersed in a criminal process against any excess or prejudice. The concept of judicial protection guarantees the rights of individuals involved in legal proceedings. These rights include knowing the accusation against them, the ability to counter the accusation using evidence to prove their innocence, and the right to be judged by an impartial judge free from any influence related to the case or their relationship with the parties involved. A fundamental challenge in the pursuit of justice is to ensure that judges remain impartial and insulated from outside interference in the cases they preside over. This impartiality is crucial to gain the trust of citizens and uphold the equality of all, regardless of their origin, color, sex, religion, or ideology. As responsible members of society, it is our duty to exercise the suffrage and elect leaders who will champion the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in all their actions. By doing so, we continue the legacy of our predecessors and maintain the progress towards a just and equitable society.

Art 11 of the UDHR: We are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

"The presumption of innocence is not only a legal principle but also a moral imperative that reflects the fundamental values of fairness and justice." Santiago Canton

Santiago A. Canton (Argentina) represent article 11. Secretary-General of the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ). Argentine lawyer with decades long experience of fighting for the advancement of human rights and the rule of law. He was the executive secretary from 2001 to 2012 of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, one of the arms of the Organization of American States tasked with reviewing rights abuses. The ICJ is an international non-governmental organization established in 1952, consisting of 60 distinguished jurists from all regions of the world. The ICJ works to advance the rule of law and the legal protection of human rights. The headquarters of the ICJ Secretariat is located in Geneva, Switzerland, and it has field presences in the Africa, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America and Middle East and North Africa regions.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH SANTIAGO:

I had the privilege of engaging in a conversation on my iPhone with Santiago Canton, who graciously agreed to participate in this project. Santiago Canton, originally from Argentina, is a highly esteemed Human Rights lawyer who has dedicated his entire career to the noble pursuit of justice. His remarkable professional journey includes holding influential positions such as the Executive Secretary and Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR). Within this significant role, Canton tirelessly worked on a multitude of high-profile cases that tackled crucial matters like freedom of expression, discrimination, and political repression. After his tenure with the IACHR, Canton assumed the role of Director at the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Human Rights. It was during this time that he formed a friendship with former President Jimmy Carter, who acknowledged the importance of defending the rights of victims. This encounter further solidified Canton's commitment to promoting and safeguarding human rights. Canton firmly believes in the power of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a guiding document for achieving justice and equality. He recognizes that education about this declaration is key to fostering a society that upholds these principles. Presently, Santiago Canton holds the esteemed position of Secretary General at the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), an organization comprised of leading jurists from around the globe. Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the ICJ plays a crucial role in advancing the rule of law and defending human rights on an international scale. In his endeavors, Santiago Canton upholds the principles enshrined in Article 11, which emphasizes the presumption of innocence until proven guilty. Through his work and advocacy, he strives to ensure that this fundamental right is respected and upheld for all individuals.

Video narration: Santiago Canton, thoughts about Article 11 UDHR.

Text: Santiago Canton, thoughts about Article 11 UDHR.

The presumption of innocence principle is a vital component of any fair and just legal system. Its historical origin, role in protecting individual rights, and prevention of wrongful convictions make it an indispensable principle in the pursuit of justice. The presumption of innocence is not only a legal principle but also a moral imperative that reflects the fundamental values of fairness and justice. Influential thinkers like John Locke and Montesquieu emphasized the importance of protecting individuals from unjust accusations and arbitrary punishment. These ideas laid the foundation for the inclusion of the principle of innocence in the UDHR. Art. 11 stands as a testament to the importance of innocence in the legal system. The second part of Art. 11 enshrines the principle of legality, another fundamental concept in the field of law, that ensures that individuals are protected from arbitrary actions by the government. It establishes that no one can be punished for an act that was not clearly defined as a crime at the time it was committed. This principle has its origins in ancient legal systems, such as the Roman law concept of "nullum crimen, nula poena sine lege". It was further developed during the Enlightenment by the influential thinker Cesare Beccaria. Both the principle of innocence and the principle of legality are cornerstones of the rule of law in a democratic society. As we continue to strive for a more just and equitable world, these principles remain guiding lights, reminding us of the importance of upholding the rights of every individual.

Art 12 of the UDHR: We have the right to privacy.

"Article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights allows us to protect ourselves from unjustified interference in our lives and to determine how we want to interact with the world." Aminatou Haidar

Aminatou Haidar (Western Sahara) represents article 12. Aminatou Haidar is an outstanding nonviolent activist and human rights defender from Western Sahara, a territory occupied by Morocco since 1975. Over 30 years of peaceful campaigning for the independence of her homeland have earned her the recognition of being known as the “Sahrawi Gandhi.” Haidar’s dignity and resolve make her one of the most respected leaders in the region. Haidar has won several international human rights awards for her work, including the 2008 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award, 2009 Civil Courage Prize and 2019 Right Livelihood Award.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH AMINATOU:

Aminatou Haidar was in Spain when I connected with her. Haidar is a prominent human rights activist and advocate for the independence of Western Sahara a former Colony of Spain. She is widely recognized as the "Sahrawi Gandhi". Born in 1966 in Western Sahara, called “Frozen country” which is currently under Moroccan control, Haidar has dedicated her life to fighting for the rights of the Sahrawi people whose cause has been neglected by the United Nations, the European Union, and the main Media. Haidar became involved in activism at a young age, participating in peaceful protests and advocating for the self-determination of the Sahrawi people. She has been a vocal critic of the Moroccan government's occupation of Western Sahara and its human rights abuses in the region. In 1987, Haidar co-founded the Collective of Sahrawi Human Rights Defenders (CODESA) to document and expose human rights violations in Western Sahara. She has been actively involved in documenting cases of torture, enforced disappearances, and arbitrary detentions perpetrated by Moroccan authorities. She was incarcerated from 1987-1991 and 2005-2006. Haidar gained international attention in 2009 when she was detained by Moroccan authorities while returning from a visit to the United States. She was subsequently expelled and denied re-entry into Western Sahara. Haidar engaged in a high-profile hunger strike at the Lanzarote Airport in Spain, demanding her right to return home. Her determination and activism drew worldwide support and led to her eventual return to Western Sahara in 2010. She has received numerous international awards, including the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award and the Right Livelihood Award. Haidar continues to advocate for the Sahrawi people's right to self-determination and works tirelessly to shed light on the human rights situation in Western Sahara. Her model for nonviolence has been Martin Luther King and Gandi. She represents Article 12 “I have a right to privacy”.

Video narration: Aminatou Haidar, thoughts about Article 12 UDHR.

Text: Aminatou Haidar, thoughts about Article 12 UDHR.

Article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights allows us to protect ourselves from unjustified interference in our lives and to determine how we want to interact with the world. Unfortunately, in the occupied territories of Western Sahara, our privacy is violated by the Moroccan occupation authorities, which have access to our bodies, places, as well as our communications and private information. One of the tools of retaliation employed by the Moroccan state against activists is to incite hatred, violence, and discrimination through defamatory campaigns. Sahrawi activists are subjected to intimidation and psychological stress through extreme surveillance and the violation of their privacy, especially women who are exposed to public ridicule through lies spread on social media. Personally, I have been the target of systematic attacks many times with the aim of damaging my reputation and that of my children. Moroccan authorities frequently launch defamatory campaigns against me in the Moroccan print and audiovisual media, as well as on various Moroccan websites and social media platforms. In late November 2021, Moroccan authorities hacked both of my mobile phones using the "Pegasus" spyware from the Israeli company N.S.O. This was confirmed after a technical examination of my phones by Amnesty International's Digital Protection Lab and Citizen Lab. In January 2022, Moroccan authorities prevented me from traveling to Spain after rejecting my European vaccination certificate, which was also leaked to the press and published on various websites, affecting my privacy. Once again, a smear campaign was launched against me.

Art 13 of the UDHR: We have the right to freedom of movement.

"This fundamental human right is not merely a legal provision but a cornerstone that empowers individuals to explore, connect, and contribute to the global community." Olga Ortiz Mera

Olga Ortiz Mera (Ecuador) represents article 13. She is a well-known international personality cosmopolitan, humanitarian and a prominent social intellectual philanthropist with a vast experience in the arts and Ecuador communication fields. She is a Former Hon. Consul of Ecuador in Miami and she had also served as a Special Advisory to the Secretary of State and Chairwoman of the Consular Corps in Miami. Founder 1975 of Broward International Woman Club. At present time, she is Co-founder and Chairman of “United Aliens Artists Foundation”, she serves in the Board of Directors of “Global Dreams USA”. Advisory Board of International Solidarity for Human Rights.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH OLGA:

Olga Ortiz Mera, a native of Ecuador, is a renowned international personality who embodies a cosmopolitan spirit. She comes from a prominent Ecuadorian family, with their endeavors spanning farming, cattle, shipbuilding, and government. She is widely recognized as a humanitarian and an influential social intellectual philanthropist. With a diverse background and extensive expertise in the arts and communication fields, she has made significant contributions to these domains. She has served as a Former Honorary Consul of Ecuador in Miami, where she represented and supported the interests of Ecuadorian nationals residing in the region. In addition to this role, Olga has held the prestigious position of Special Advisor to the Secretary of State, contributing her expertise and insights to matters of significance. Her family holds a strong belief in the importance of education for the Indigenous people of Ecuador, children from Colombia and Dominican Republic, and Olga's philanthropic efforts align with this vision. She actively supports initiatives that prioritize education. Furthermore, her global presence is evident through her property ownership in Ecuador, El Salvador, the United States, and Argentina. Olga Ortiz Mera embodies the principles outlined in Article 13, which enshrines the right to freedom of movement. Through her work and personal endeavors, she stands as a representative of this fundamental human right.

Video narration: Olga Ortiz Mera, thoughts about article 13 UDHR.

Text: Olga Ortiz Mera, thoughts about Article 13 UDHR.

As a champion of indigenous rights, women's empowerment, community leadership, and a believer that teaching and sharing are the true meaning of life, I firmly believe in the profound significance of Article 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), which enshrines the right to freedom of movement. Having served as the Former Honorary Consul of Ecuador in Miami and as a Special Advisor to the Secretary of State, coupled with my role as Chairwoman of the Consular Corps in Miami, I have firsthand witnessed the transformative power of freedom of movement. This fundamental human right is not merely a legal provision but a cornerstone that empowers individuals to explore, connect, and contribute to the global community. In my multifaceted journey as a humanitarian and advocate, I recognize that freedom of movement is intrinsic to fostering cultural exchange, understanding, and collaboration. It transcends borders, facilitating the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and experiences that enrich societies and promote a shared global perspective. I have seen how the unrestricted flow of individuals across nations fosters creativity and innovation, creating a vibrant tapestry of diverse cultural expressions. Furthermore, my experiences in diplomatic and consular roles have reinforced the vital role that freedom of movement plays in diplomacy and international relations. It is a catalyst for building bridges, fostering cooperation, and addressing global challenges collectively. The ability of individuals to traverse borders freely is integral to creating a world where dialogue and understanding prevail over division and isolation. In essence, Article 13 of the UDHR is not just a legal provision; it is a beacon that illuminates the path toward a more interconnected, compassionate, and harmonious world. It is a right that resonates with my personal and professional journey, encapsulating the essence of a global citizen dedicated to the betterment of humanity through the unrestricted pursuit of knowledge, collaboration, and cultural exchange.

Art 14 of the UDHR: We have the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.

"Welcoming individuals and families fleeing political, religious, and other persecution is an integral part of our international commitment to human rights." Camila Rice-Aguilar

Camila Rice-Aguilar (United States-Nicaragua) represents article 14. She is a Communications Associate at Human Rights First, is dedicated to assisting asylum seekers residing in the greater Washington D.C., New York City, and Los Angeles metropolitan areas who lack legal representation. Her upbringing in both Nicaragua and the U.S. ignited her passion for advocating international human rights, immigrant rights, and environmental justice. She holds dual bachelor’s degrees in international relations and Latin American and Caribbean Studies with Honors from Brown University. Her thesis, which focuses on the Central American Migrant Trail, aims to address the root causes of migration to alleviate human rights abuses against transit migrants and mitigate forced displacement in the region.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH CAMILA:

I had the pleasure of meeting Camila Rice-Aguilar at my New York City studio. She is the daughter of Paul Rice and a graduate of Brown University. Currently, she resides in New York, although her roots trace back to her hometown of Berkeley, California and Esteli, Nicaragua. Camila's formative years were spent in Berkeley, where she lived with her mother—an immigrant from Nicaragua—her father, and her brother. Her father, deeply committed to developing his organization, Fair Trade USA, often traveled and took Camila to see farms and crops around the world. Camila was always very inspired by his work empowering farmworkers and fighting for better wages and treatment in the workplace. Her mother raised her with annual trips to see family in Nicaragua, where Camila spent time on farms and in the countryside. At home in Berkeley, Camila and her brother helped their mother navigate the language and cultural barriers of living in the U.S. These experiences deeply influenced her perspective and compassion for human rights. In high school, Camila was involved in grassroots advocacy around women’s rights, worker rights, immigrant rights, and environmental justice. During her time at Brown University, Camila delved into the study of international human rights with a focus on immigration, which has become a central passion in her life. She has spent the last 6 years in the immigration space learning how to safeguard immigrant rights and protect the right to seek asylum through legal representation, policy advocacy, and community organizing.

Currently, she serves as a Communications Strategist at Human Rights First, dedicating herself to assisting asylum seekers in Washington D.C, New York City, and the Los Angeles area who lack legal representation.

Video narration: Camila Rice-Aguilar, thoughts about Article 14 UDHR.

Text: Camila Rice-Aguilar, thoughts about Article 14 UDHR.

In the midst of a global humanitarian crisis, asylum can often mean the difference between life and death. Welcoming individuals and families fleeing political, religious, and other persecution is an integral part of our international commitment to human rights. Every person deserves a life of dignity, security, and prosperity. That is why asylum is a fundamental human right. In my work, I see how asylum provides lifesaving protections and allows individuals and their families to rebuild their lives. Asylum also enriches our communities and strengthens our bonds to different cultures and people. We must protect these systems of refuge for persecuted and displaced people to seek safety.

Art 15 of the UDHR: I have the right to a nationality.

"I felt like an invisible citizen, always on the fringes of society, unable to fully participate or find a sense of belonging." Maha Mamo

Maha Mamo (Lebanon-Brazil) represents article 15. For nearly 30 years, she was a stateless person. Born in Lebanon, in 1988, to Syrian citizens. The fact that her father was Christian, and her mother was Muslim made them impossible to register their marriage legally, also Maha's birth, preventing her to gain citizenship. She was also not considered Lebanese as the Lebanon nationality law does not automatically grant citizenship to people born there. Without documents, she lived a childhood full of struggles, to study, to get medical care, to even walk in the streets, having to avoid police control points, because she had no identity documents to prove her nationality or identity. In 2018, by a change of laws, Brazil recognized stateless people, making naturalization possible. On 4 October 2018, Maha received the document announcing her citizenship from Brazil’s Ambassador to the United Nations. Maha is an activist for the UNHCR campaign #IBelong, supporting stateless people. She is also an author, global speaker, human rights activist, U.N facilitator, and TEDx speaker.

ARTIST WILMA BULKING SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH MAHA:

I connected with Maha Mamo while she was in Paris. Her 30-year journey toward Brazilian citizenship marked a significant turning point in her life, granting her the freedoms that statelessness imposes on an individual. Their parents were born in Syria, and they intended to marry in Syria. However, they faced an obstacle as Christian-Muslim unions are not accepted in Syria, where interreligious marriages are not recognized. Consequently, they decided to move to Lebanon, where Maha, her sister, and brother were born. Unfortunately, Lebanon only confers nationality if your father is Lebanese. Furthermore, both Lebanon and Syria do not accept interreligious marriages as valid. Given that her father is Christian, and her mother is Muslim, they could only formalize their union through a religious ceremony. Maha, along with her sister and brother, faced a complex challenge in obtaining citizenship recognition in Lebanon until Brazil accepted their case and granted them legal status. Upon acquiring Brazilian citizenship, Maha's destiny took new turns, including her marriage to a partner from Michigan, USA. Currently, Maha is an activist for the UNHCR campaign #IBelong, supporting stateless people. She is also an author, global speaker, human rights activist, U.N. facilitator, and TEDx speaker.

Video narration: Maha Mamo, thoughts about Article 15 UDHR.

Text: Maha Mamo, thoughts about Article 15 UDHR.

As a human rights activist and motivational speaker, Article 15 holds a deeply personal significance in my life. It is not just a principle I advocate for, but a fundamental right that has shaped my own journey as a stateless individual seeking belonging and acquiring my Brazilian nationality. Born into statelessness, I have firsthand experience of the impact that being denied nationality can have. Growing up, I faced numerous challenges due to the lack of legal recognition, which severely limited my access to education, healthcare, and basic rights. I felt like an invisible citizen, always on the fringes of society, unable to fully participate or find a sense of belonging. By openly sharing my own experiences, I embarked on a personal and professional journey to champion the rights of the stateless and raise awareness about the devastating consequences they endure. My goal is to humanize the issue and spark empathy and understanding among others. I became a passionate advocate for justice and equality. A beacon of hope, representing the universal recognition that every person deserves a nationality, regardless of their background or circumstances. Through my advocacy efforts, I am dedicated to transforming the ideals of Article 15 into tangible actions. My commitment extends beyond my own experiences, as I strive to make a lasting impact on the countless others who remain trapped in a stateless existence and to create a world where no individual has to endure the hardships of statelessness. I firmly believe that by amplifying the voices of the stateless, we can push for crucial policy reforms and systemic changes. I have personally undergone a profound transformation from a state of invisibility to one of empowerment. This newfound purpose has provided me with a platform to fight tirelessly for justice, equality, and the rights of every individual to be recognized and protected under the law.

Art 16 of the UDHR: We have the right to marry and to found a family.

"The acknowledgment that every adult possesses the right to marry and have a family is a celebration of human autonomy and the freedom to make choices that deeply impact our personal lives." Vladimir Issaev

Vladimir Issaev (Russia-Venezuela- USA) represents article 16. Mr. Issaev is considered one of the top ballet masters and choreographers worldwide. Vladimir Issaev is currently Ballet Master, Choreographer & Artistic Director of Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida. He was the former Ballet Master of Ballet Nacional de Caracas Teresa Carreño and the Miami City Ballet School. Recently he has been appointed as the Artistic Director of the Asia Ballet Academy in Malaysia.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH VLADIMIR:

Vladimir Issaev graciously visited my studio, where I had the privilege of conducting an interview with him and capturing his portrait for the project. It was an inspiring opportunity to connect with this esteemed Ballet Master, Choreographer, and Artistic Director, allowing me to delve deeper into his artistic journey and capture his essence through the lens of my camera. The interview and portrait session provided valuable insights and a visual representation of Vladimir's remarkable contributions to the world of ballet. "Born in Siberia, Russia, in 1954, Vladimir began his ballet studies at the Choreographic School of Voronezh at the age of 11, eventually obtaining the degree of "Ballet Artist" in 1973." Subsequently, he embarked on a successful career as a ballet dancer, performing at esteemed institutions such as the Opera House of Ufa and the Opera House of Odessa. In pursuit of further excellence, Vladimir was accepted into the prestigious State Institute of Arts Lunacharsky G.I.T.I.S. in Moscow, where he excelled in his studies and graduated in 1986 with the highest honors as a Ballet Master and Master Choreographer. He had to leave Russia to Venezuela. Upon his migration to Venezuela in 1987, he sought to establish a family, a goal he successfully achieved. He was also the former Ballet Master of Ballet Nacional Caracas, and he had the distinction of being the youngest Director among all ballet schools in the Soviet Union before leaving Russia to Venezuela. In 1998 he and his second wife, Ruby Romero, moved to the USA and stablished a new home with their 3 children. He holds the positions of Ballet Master, choreographer, and artistic director at the Arts Ballet Theater of Florida. He kas dedicated himself to teaching the Imperial Ballet Seminar, imparting the rich heritage of Russian ballet technique to a diverse group of children from Florida. Many of his students have achieved international recognition through various prizes and competitions. Vladimir finds immense happiness in raising his family and working and living in this democratic country. In many ways, Vladimir Issaev embodies the principles articulated in Article 16: "I have a right to marry and have a family."

Video narration: Vladimir Issaev, thoughts about Article 16 UDHR.

Text: Vladimir Issaev, thoughts about Article 16 UDHR.

Article 16 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights delves into the very fabric of our intimate lives, recognizing the fundamental right of every adult to marry and form a family if they so desire. It is a declaration that transcends gender, emphasizing equal rights for women and men not only during the course of their marriages but also in the event of divorce. The acknowledgment that every adult possesses the right to marry and have a family is a celebration of human autonomy and the freedom to make choices that deeply impact our personal lives. It goes beyond legal formalities, touching upon the essence of human relationships and the inherent dignity of individuals to pursue meaningful connections and familial bonds. As I interpret Article 16, I see it as a powerful affirmation of the sanctity of personal relationships and the importance of the family as a building block of society. It extends beyond legal frameworks, reaching into the realm of shared human experiences, aspirations, and the bonds that tie us together. Emigrating to the United States further emphasized that the right to have a family transcends geographical boundaries. The USA became the canvas for a new chapter in my life, providing opportunities and freedoms that proved instrumental in shaping the lives of my loved ones and me. The significance of Article 16 became increasingly tangible as I worked towards creating a better future for my family. Additionally, within the realm of my professional life, I consider each of my ballet students and dancers as part of my extended family. Through hours of dedicated work, learning, and preparation, I see them as more than just performers; they are my extended family spread around the world. In this role, I perceive myself as a father figure, providing love, education, and values to nurture their growth and prepare them for a brilliant future in both their artistic endeavors and life as a whole.

Article 17 UDHR: We have the right to own private property.

"Throughout history many marginalized groups, including women and ethnic minorities, have seen their right to own property curtailed, affecting their effective realization of other fundamental rights." Juanita Goebertus Estrada.

Juanita Goebertus Estrada (Colombia) represents Article 17. Director of the Americas Division of Human Rights Watch. Juanita is a Colombian lawyer and holds BAs in Law and Political Science from the Universidad de Los Andes (Colombia) and an LLM from Harvard Law School. She has been an international human rights and humanitarian law advocate throughout her career in government, academia, and civil society. Human Rights Watch defend the rights of people worldwide. HRW scrupulously investigate abuses, expose the facts widely, and pressure those with power to respect rights and secure justice. It works to uphold human dignity and advance the cause of human rights for all.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH JUANITA:

I had a conversation with Juanita Goebertus Estrada over an iPhone call from Colombia. She is a vibrant, exceptionally intelligent, and talented human rights champion who has recently taken on the role of the new director of Human Rights Watch's Americas. Juanita is a lawyer and a political scientist with expertise in peace, security, transitional justice, and post-conflict matters. She graduated from Harvard Law School, conducted research at the Hauser Center of the Kennedy School at Harvard University, and served as a research assistant at the Fundacion Ideas para la Paz. As observed in numerous countries where autocracy prevails over democracy, the seizure of private property from individuals has become a prevalent issue. Juanita's passion lies in advocating for the rights of individuals who own property, making her a compelling representative for Article 17, which asserts, "I have the right to own private property." In her role as the director of Human Rights Watch's Americas, Juanita brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the forefront of the fight for the rights of people. Her background in law and political science, coupled with her extensive research and practical involvement in peace and transitional justice, positions her as a dynamic advocate for the rights enshrined in Article 17.

Video narration: Juanita Goebertus Estrada, thoughts about Article 17 UDHR.

Text: Juanita Goebertus Estrada, thoughts about Article 17 UDHR.

Article 17 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights establishes the right to own property alone or in association with others and the prohibition of being arbitrarily deprived of property. As the UN General Assembly has noted, the different forms of legal property ownership help establish a basis for political, economic, and social justice. Throughout history many marginalized groups, including women and ethnic minorities, have seen their right to own property curtailed, affecting their effective realization of other fundamental rights. At times, the right to own property has been incorporated in national legislations without taking in consideration the unique cultural, spiritual, and economic ways of living of such groups of population as Indigenous peoples. In today’s societies the right to property should allow all individuals to develop a more independent, autonomous life and help overcome unfair economic systems. This basic right should go hand in hand with ensuring the rights to food, housing, and social security for everyone.

Article 18 UDHR: We have the right to freedom of thought and religion.

"Described as “the forgotten right”, it is a right that is uniquely challenged by emerging technology that is designed to extract our innermost thoughts and use our vulnerabilities to judge or manipulate us." Susie Alegre

Susie Alegre (United Kingdom) represents article 18. Is an international human rights lawyer, author and speaker. She has worked on some of the most challenging legal and political issues of our time including human rights & security, combating corruption in the developing world, protecting human rights at borders, the human rights impact of climate change, privacy, cybersecurity, disinformation, data protection and neurotech. Her recent work has focused on the impact of technology and the digital world on human rights and our freedom to think for ourselves. She is the author of the Book "Freedom to Think: Protecting a Fundamental Human Right in the Digital Age," which was recognized as a Book of the Year in 2022. Susie has an MA Honours in French and Philosophy from the University of Edinburgh, an MA in International Human Rights Law from the University of Nantes and a PhD by prior publication in international human rights law from the University of Roehampton.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH SUSIE:

I had the opportunity to have a conversation with Susie Alegre through iPhone while she was in London. She is an international human rights lawyer hailing from the Isle of Man and is particularly renowned for her pioneering work in digital rights and counter-terrorism efforts. Susie's academic journey saw her transition from philosophy to the field of law, eventually leading to her appointment as a judge on the Isle of Man. Subsequently, she ventured into the realm of international human rights. Her primary areas of focus include combating corruption in international development, ensuring human rights are upheld in the fight against terrorism, safeguarding human rights at borders, protecting human rights from the impacts of climate change (especially pertinent to her being from the Isle of Man), preserving privacy and cybersecurity, countering disinformation, and securing data. Her background in philosophy equips her with valuable insights into ethical dilemmas. Furthermore, she has authored a book titled "Freedom to Think: The Long Struggle to Liberate Our Minds." During our online interaction, I also had the pleasure of meeting her 11-year-old daughter. Susie epitomizes Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which asserts the right to freedom of thought and religion.

Video narration: Susie Alegre, thoughts about Article 18 UDHR.

Text: Susie Alegre, thoughts about Article 18 UDHR.

Article 18 gives us the right to freedom of thought, conscience and belief. This is a profoundly important right which gives us the freedom to be human, to develop and change our inner lives and to have a sanctuary inside our heads where we can weigh up the information we receive without pressure or coercion. The right to keep our thoughts private, free from manipulation and the right not to be penalized for our thoughts alone is vital for both the human spirit and for rational thinking. And it is protected absolutely because it protects the core of our humanity. Described as “the forgotten right”, it is a right that is uniquely challenged by emerging technology that is designed to extract our innermost thoughts and use our vulnerabilities to judge or manipulate us. From social media and recommender algorithms, through emotion recognition technology to neurotechnology and brain-computer interfaces connecting our brains seamlessly to technology, the importance of our right to freedom of thought has never been more clear. Now more than ever, Article 18 is a crucial protection of what it means to be human.

Article 19 UDHR: We have the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

"We all have the right to exercise it, but we also have the duty to defend it at all times and under all circumstances so that no one and nothing can take this right away from us." Ana Ferreirós Miguéns

Ana Ferreirós Miguéns (Spain) represents article 19. Head of External Affairs CTV Hand Made Productions, Spain. Netflix - O Sabor das Margaridas. Ana has extensive experience working in both production and commercial departments within the audiovisual industry. Ana holds a degree in EDUCATIONAL SCIENCES from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH ANA:

In 2021, I had the privilege of traveling to Spain, more precisely to Galicia, in the company of Elizabeth Sanchez Vegas and Devorah Sasha, who are Directors of International Solidarity for Human Rights. During this trip, they introduced me to Ana Ferreirós Miguéns, a prominent figure in the realm of television and film production, as well as an educator. Ana is a sophisticated, intelligent, and remarkable individual who has dedicated numerous years of her life to championing the cause of freedom of expression through her work. Her commitment resonates strongly with Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which enshrines our right to freedom of opinion and expression.

Video narration: Ana Ferreirós Miguéns, thought about Article 19 UDHR.

Text: Ana Ferreirós Miguéns, thought about Article 19 UDHR.

The freedom of expression and opinion is a fundamental and essential pillar for all peoples, contributing to the preservation and defense of individuals' rights, and therefore, strengthening society and democracy. It must be exercised with tolerance while respecting the honor and privacy of our fellow human beings. Unfortunately, in the midst of the 21st century, the democratic health of many countries remains weak, opaque, and oppressive. They employ censorship, intimidation, bribery, and blackmail against those who raise their voices to confront oppressors, combat injustices, and defend their rights. We all have the right to exercise it, but we also have the duty to defend it at all times and under all circumstances so that no one and nothing can take this right away from us.

Article 20 UDHR: We have the right to freedom of peaceful assembly.

"It is a tool which can be used by the most downtrodden in society to assert their rights." Mary Lawlor

Mary Lawlor (Ireland) represents article 20. Mary Lawlor is the UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders. In this capacity, she monitors, addresses, and reports on the situations of human rights defenders worldwide to the United Nations in New York and Geneva. She conducts country visits and offers recommendations to governments. Born and educated in Ireland, she is the Adjunct Professor of Business and Human Rights in the School of Business of Trinity College Dublin. In 2001, she founded Front Line Defenders, the International Foundation for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders. Among her notable awards are the French Chevalier de l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneu and the Franco-German Award for Human Rights and the Rule of Law.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH MARY:

I had the delightful opportunity to engage with. Mary Lawler via iPhone she was in in Dublin, Ireland. With over two decades of experience, she has dedicated herself to defending and safeguarding human rights defenders facing risks, notably through the establishment of Front-Line Defenders. In May 2020, Mary assumed the role of Special Rapporteur for human rights defenders, a position she continues to hold with a three-year mandate from the UN Human Rights Council, the world's foremost international organization for human rights. Mary's exceptional contributions have earned her Honorary Law degrees from both University College Dublin and Trinity College Dublin. She has also been honored with awards such as the Legion of Honor from France, the Franco-German Award for Human Rights and Rule of Law, and the Irish Red Cross Lifetime Achievement Award. Beyond her remarkable work in the field of human rights, Mary Lawler also possesses a keen interest in Montessori teaching. Her advocacy aligns closely with the principles of Article 20, which recognizes our right to freedom of assembly.

Video Narration: Mary Lawlor, thoughts about Article 20 UDHR.

Text: Mary Lawlor, thoughts about Article 20 UDHR.

The ability to peacefully assemble and associate with others will always hold a special importance for me because I have seen how this right has been used to fight for, and win, such a huge variety of other human rights down through the years. There is something fundamental in joining together with others to peacefully promote or protest a common cause - you don’t need any qualifications, or special experience, or even resources - it is a tool which can be used by the most downtrodden in society to assert their rights. I still find great inspiration in this, and how peaceful protest has been used to topple dictators, win equal rights for women and progress social change. For all the challenges that the internet brings to human rights, it has also been inspiring to see how the right to peaceful assembly has been exercised online. Rights-based movements have developed across continents, crossing boundaries of age, ethnicity, race, gender and class to bring people together. Parallel protest movements have emerged in different countries, accentuating their urgency, facilitated and networked by online assembly. As the founder of an NGO myself in a previous life, the right to freedom of association is one I cherish, and it has been dispiriting to see this right come under attack in recent years, as governments introduce ever stricter laws to limit the work of non-governmental organisations. This in itself is a testament to how effective they have been in their work. It does require a response though, because the risk to so many other rights increase as the right to freedom of association decreases - sadly Russia has been a glaring example of this over the past five years.

Article 21 UDHR: We have the right to have free and fair elections.

"This article assures me that when I arrive at the polling station, circle in the little bubbles, and file the paper into the machine, I am heard." Brenda Ochoa

Brenda Ochoa (Cuba) represents Article 21. She completed her high school education at Miami Arts Studio 6-12 Zelda Glazer, Miami Dade County Public Schools (MDCPS) system. Currently, she is pursuing her undergraduate studies at Florida International University. In addition to her academic pursuits, Brenda also worked as an intern at International Solidarity for Human Rights during the Summer Youth Internship program at MDCPS in 2021-2022.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH BRENDA:

Brenda Ochoa came to my Studio at Palm Beach, Florida. Brenda, who recently celebrated her eighteenth birthday, is a first-generation Cuban American. She exercised her right to vote for the very first time and expressed her feelings of nervousness and pride. Brenda emphasized the significance of being able to shape the future of her community through her vote and the power it grants her as a voice for democracy. She aspires to pursue a degree in Political Science and has a year of experience as an intern with the International Solidarity for Human Rights. Brenda's active engagement aligns perfectly with the principles of Article 21 which underscores the right to participate in free and fair elections.

Video Narration: Brenda Ochoa, thoughts about Article 21 UDHR.

Text: Brenda Ochoa, thoughts about Article 21 UDHR.

The 21st Article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is one whose impact forms a fundamental pillar for constituents around the world. The 21st Article enables me to take action, make my opinions known to the officials that represent the peoples will and to make an impact in my country. To myself, a first-generation immigrant and aspiring youth the 21st Article is freedom. It is my will, it is hopes, dreams and sacrifice. The article assures me that when I arrive at the polling station, circle in the little bubbles, and file the paper into the machine I am heard. It is my voice, and it is the future of generations to come.

Article 22 UDHR: We have the right to a social security.

"The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is more than a random list; rather, the document has an interdependent internal architecture." Susan Marie Frontczak

Susan Marie Frontczak (USA) represents Article 22. For over 25 years, Susan Marie Frontczak has brought literature and history to life as a scholar, playwright, and performer. With ten distinct Living History programs, she has captivated audiences in 43 U.S. states and abroad. Among her most compelling performances is her portrayal of Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, the former First Lady of the United States, who played a pivotal role in drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Susan Marie earned a B.S. in Engineering from Swarthmore College and a master's in software engineering from the Wang Institute of Graduate Studies. Susan Marie has always viewed both science and art as complimentary outlets for creativity.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH SUSAN MARIE:

I had the pleasure of meeting Susan Frontczak several years ago when she delivered a captivating performance as Eleanor Roosevelt at Miami Dade College. Susan is renowned for her meticulously researched first-person living history portrayals. While she initially pursued a successful career as an engineer and manager, her passion for dance and storytelling led her down a different path. She cultivated her performance art by delving into the stories and characters of remarkable women in history, including Madame Curie, Mary Shelley, Irene Castle, Clara Barton, and Erma Bombeck. Susan's work resonates closely with the principles of Article 22, which underscores the right to social security. However, she also emphasizes that the essence of this article lies in its capacity to teach equality and combat bigotry, with the underlying belief that all individuals are inherently equal.

Video Narration: Susan Marie Frontczak, thoughts about Article 22 UDHR.

Text: Susan Marie Frontczak, thoughts about Article 22 UDHR.

Article 22, introducing the concept of social and economic rights, must be understood in the context of the whole. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is more than a random list; rather, the document has an interdependent internal architecture. The first two articles lay the groundwork for and apply to all the other articles. Then, just as Article 3 states the overarching principle for the civil and political rights (Articles 4 through 21), Article 22 establishes the overall intent of the economic and social rights (Articles 23 through 27). The final three articles, 28 through 30, bound the context in which all the rights are to operate. The social and economic rights speak to the quality of life, in terms of both what it takes to survive (food, clothing, shelter, and medical care) and what it takes to thrive (education, fair working conditions and compensation, recreation, access to culture, and protection of creative pursuits). In Article 22, the phrase “as a member of society” recognizes that we are all in this together. To me this means that society as a whole is responsible for every individual within it. It also means to me that society benefits and becomes stronger to the degree that all are afforded the opportunity for full development of their potential.

Article 23 UDHR: We have the right to work.

The right to work gives me better advantages and choices over those who have neglected or chosen to turn down this awesome advantage. Angelena Jackson

Angelena Jackson (USA) represents article 23. She is a Community Ambassador, Guest Room Attendant, Activist/ Motivational Speaker, Live-In House Monitor.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH ANGELENA:

She came to my studio with a life story marked by incredible adversity and unwavering resilience. She grew up as a survivor of sexual and physical abuse, abandoned by her mother, who herself battled bipolar disorder. Fortunately, her grandfather stepped in to provide the stability she needed. As she transitioned into her teenage years, Angelena found herself trapped in a cycle of addiction, particularly to drugs and crack cocaine. Her life took a troubling turn, involving drug trafficking and landing her in prison seven times. However, a transformative moment occurred when she reached her fifties. Perhaps it was the harsh reality of witnessing the suffering, neglect, and even death of fellow inmates during the COVID-19 pandemic that triggered her epiphany. It was during this time that Angelena recognized the potential lethality of her actions and resolved to make a profound change. Determined to take a positive step forward, she applied to Leap, a program designed to teach life coaching skills that could improve her prospects and help her secure meaningful employment. Her journey of self-improvement had begun. Angelena's commitment and dedication paid off when she secured a position as an outreach volunteer at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, proudly wearing her uniform. But her path took an unexpected turn when she received a work call during her rest break, offering her a chance to work at the prestigious Biltmore Hotel. Given her past as an ex-convict, Angelena had reservations about whether they would accept her. However, the person who interviewed her saw something remarkable in her and believed that this opportunity could be her turning point. Angelena quickly proved herself to be an exemplary worker, earning the trust and admiration of her colleagues. Beyond her job, she took on the role of an inspirational speaker, using her experiences to advocate for a more effective rehabilitation program within the prison system. She became a living embodiment of Article 23, which declares, "I have the right to work." Angelena's story is a powerful testament to the strength of the human spirit and the capacity for redemption and personal growth.

Video Narration: Angelena Jackson, thoughts about Article 23 UDHR.

Text: Angelena Jackson, thoughts about article 23 UDHR.

The right to work means having a better quality of life. It means having the ability to make better choices. Whether it is the food I eat, the clothes I wear, the car I drive, the place I live or my insurance coverage. Financial freedom is one of the many opportunities of having the right to work. It means that I can and am able to purchase items for myself, my family and others. The opportunity to donate my time and finances is presented to me. I no longer must stress and worry about where my next dollar or meal is going to come from. I can also decide on the vehicle I choose to drive. The right to work gives me better advantages and choices over those who have neglected or chosen to turn down this awesome advantage. I can afford healthcare. Better nutrition and healthcare increase my life expectancy. With access to nutritional information and education, I can make more informed choices whether I choose to eat organic or vegan, which is expensive. Having a job or the right to work provides a stable income. Which greatly reduces economic anxiety and stress levels. It also enables an individual, like me, to provide much needed help and aid to family, friends, and others in need. It opens the opportunity to network, meet new people, learn new skills. Having employment affords me time to sharpen both hard and soft skills while learning new languages and/or cultures. Finally, travelling, meeting new people and exploring the world is within my reach. This is what having the right to work means to me. It means opening a world of opportunity for a girl born in the ghetto with no lifeline until now.

Article 24 UDHR: We have the right to rest and leisure.

"To me, Article 24 is the cornerstone of a life worthy of the name. When everyone can strike the right balance between working and not working, we will all be better people living better lives in a better world." Carl Honoré

Carl Honoré (Canada) represents article 24. Carl Honoré is a Canadian journalist, an award-winning writer, broadcaster, and TED speaker. Following his university studies, he worked with children living on the streets in Brazil. Subsequently, he spent a decade as a journalist covering South America and Europe before transitioning to writing books. He is the influential voice of the global Slow Movement, encouraging readers worldwide to embrace a more relaxed, contemplative, and richly savored lifestyle. His books, available in 35 languages, have consistently achieved bestseller status in numerous countries. Newsweek has recognized him as an international spokesperson for the concept of leisure. His two main-stage TED Talks have amassed millions of views. In a humorous twist of irony, while researching "In Praise of Slow," Carl received a speeding ticket.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH CARL:

I had the pleasure of connecting with Carl Honore through my iPhone, as he resides in London, England. Carl Honore, a Canadian journalist, is renowned as the leading advocate of the slow movement. He has earned accolades as an award-winning writer, a prominent broadcaster, and a TED speaker. With a global reputation, Carl is widely recognized as the go-to expert on the principles of the slow movement, which emphasize a deliberate pace of life over the rush for speed. In his literary portfolio, Carl has penned three influential books: "In Praise of Slow," "Under Pressure," and "The Slow Fix." Additionally, he authored "Bolder: Making the Most of Our Longer Lives," which offers insights into embracing the opportunities of an extended lifespan. Carl's commitment to spreading the message of slowness extends to young readers with his children's book, titled "It's the Journey, Not the Destination." Beyond his literary pursuits, Carl has made significant contributions to education by serving on the Board of Trustees of Hewitt School in New York City, a prestigious institution dedicated to the education of girls. Carl Honore's philosophy encourages us to allocate as much time to leisure as we do to work, allowing us to explore and understand the "Human Stuff" within the realm of existential thought. His advocacy aligns perfectly with the principles outlined in Article 24, which asserts, "I have the right to rest and leisure."

Video Narration: Carl Honore, thoughts about Article 24 UDHR.

Text: Carl Honore, thoughts about article 24 UDHR.

All work and no play make everyone dull. Human beings are not machines or algorithms. We cannot and should not work without stopping. Because a life without rest and leisure is not really a life at all. Earning a living is important, but modern culture places far too much value on paid work. We all need enough time away from work to rest and recharge – and not just as a means to working better. Why? Because leisure should be an end in itself. What we do with our free time gives texture, shape and meaning to our lives. “It is in his pleasure that a man really lives,” said Agnes Repplier, an American essayist. “It is from his leisure that he constructs the true fabric of self.” To me, Article 24 is the cornerstone of a life worthy of the name. When everyone can strike the right balance between working and not working, we will all be better people living better lives in a better world.

Article 25th UDHR: We have the right to health, food, and shelter.

"Health is often confused with healthcare, as the latter is essential for achieving optimal health." Carles Marfany

Carles Álvarez Marfany (Andorra) represents article 25. Pharmacist - Ambassador of the Principality of Andorra to the Republic of San Marino and the Holy See. Former Andorra Minister of Health.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH CARLES:

Six years ago, I had the pleasure of meeting Carles Alvarez Marfany during his tenure as the Minister of Health in the Principality of Andorra. At that time, he had an ambitious vision to replicate Spain's successful Route to Human Rights by International Solidarity for Human Rights (ISHR). His determination led him to seek a meeting with the ISHR's directors, Elizabeth Sánchez Vegas and Devorah Sasha. I was in the meeting, so I met him. He expressed his inspiration drawn from the route in Spain and shared his plan to establish a similar route, christened the "Healthy Pathway to Human Rights." This initiative materialized, adorning a popular ski route with 30 signs representing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Today, Carles Alvarez Marfany holds the esteemed position of Ambassador of the Principality of Andorra to the Republic of San Marino and the Holy City (The Vatican). In this role, he embodies the principles outlined in Article 25, which asserts, "I have the right to health, food, and shelter." Carles Alvarez Marfany's dedication to promoting human rights and his contributions to initiatives like the "Healthy Pathway to Human Rights" stand as a testament to his commitment to ensuring the well-being and rights of all individuals.

Video Narration: Carles Alvarez Marfany, thoughts about Article 25 UDHR.

Text: Cales Alvarez Marfany, thoughts about Article 25 UDHR.

Health is often confused with healthcare, as the latter is essential for achieving optimal health. However, it is not the only element to consider. As the WHO rightly states, health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of ailments or diseases, which can be addressed through quality healthcare that is easily accessible to all. Thus, we can see that physical well-being will receive greater attention in the distribution of resources, as it can easily affect political gains. On the other hand, achieving mental and social well-being requires a different level of complexity. In addition to resources, it will require significant doses of justice, education, and many more human rights. Hence, the connection between rights, as it is challenging to achieve one separately without addressing the whole, which inevitably leads us to consider and apply Right 30.

Article 26th UDHR: We have the right to education.

"Education serves the role as the great equalizer and establishes a hope that individuals and/or groups can break the cycles of poverty and hope for a better future." Robert C. Brazofsky.

Robert C. Brazofsky (USA) represents article 26. Director Department of Social Sciences Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS). Robert Brazofsky manages the Social Sciences K-12 Curriculum and Related Initiatives plus District staff for the 3rd largest public school system in the nation. M-DCPS contains 516 schools and 334,261 students.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH ROBERT:

Robert Brazofsky currently serves as the Executive Director of the Department of Social Sciences at Miami-Dade County Public Schools. In this influential capacity, he assumes the critical role of overseeing and guiding educational initiatives and programs that pertain to the social sciences within the school district. His wide-ranging responsibilities encompass curriculum development, teacher support, fostering student engagement, and the overall enhancement of social studies education for students in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools system. Mr. Brazofsky holds a Specialist Degree in Educational Leadership from Barry University, a master's degree in education with a specialization in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) from the University of Miami, and a bachelor's degree in education with a Comprehensive Social Science focus, emphasizing history and intensive language instruction in Spanish. These qualifications underscore his dedication to education and his commitment to ensuring the success of both educators and students in his community. He has proactively introduced the "Human Rights Class in a Box" program developed by International Solidarity for Human Rights (ISHR) into all grade levels, from kindergarten through 12th grade. This forward-thinking program is designed to elevate the quality of human rights knowledge and practices.

Video narration: Robert Brazofsky, thoughts about Article 26 UDHR.

Text: Robert Brazofsky, thoughts about Article 26 UDHR.

The right to an education as expressed in Article 26 of the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) should be viewed as essential in not only guaranteeing and supporting one's fundamental right to an education but also, paving the way for humankind to understand the other 29 rights contained in the UDHR. All aspects that support free and civil societies rely on public education institutions to instill in their students a bank of knowledge and skills that can sustain, expand, and respect rights and freedoms. Education serves the role as the great equalizer and establishes a hope that individuals and/or groups can break the cycles of poverty and hope for a better future. In addition, effective education systems emphasize their civic mission assisting students in becoming informed, engaged, and participatory citizens. Since early in the history of the United States, even prior to becoming an independent republic, education has been seen as an important responsibility and duty that a community must provide in order establish a future that can thrive and flourish.

Article 27th UDHR: We have the right to cultural life and the protection of authors rights.

"Among these rights are two crucial principles that underscore the importance of cultural engagement and the protection of intellectual creations." Doug McCraw

Doug McCraw (USA) represents article 27. FAT Village was created by Flagler Warehouses to rally philanthropic support to advance and sustain the arts in the downtown Fort Lauderdale community. Property owners Doug McCraw and Lutz Hofbauer created it to rally philanthropic support around sustaining an artist community. Its purpose is to promote the creation, exhibition, curation, research, and education of emerging, contemporary artists. FAT Village Metaverse will be a reality in 2025.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH DOUG:

As a working artist in Fort Lauderdale, I had the pleasure of meeting Doug McCraw many years ago while he was in the process of developing a community art village known as FAT Village (Flagler/Art/Technology or Food/Art/Technology). This village encompasses four blocks dedicated to the arts and food, operating as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Doug McCraw's entrepreneurial skills in fostering team spirit have played a pivotal role in the community's success. He embodies the principles outlined in Article 27, which states, "I have the right to cultural life and to protection of author's rights." In essence, he has been a champion of cultural rights and the protection of artists' intellectual property. FAT Village™ serves as an arts district with a clear purpose to promote the creation, exhibition, curation, research, and education of emerging contemporary artists. This community strives to establish an inclusive art environment by offering diverse programs that encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration and experimentation. Doug McCraw's vision and leadership have not only shaped FAT Village into a thriving hub for artists but also upheld the principles of cultural rights and artistic protection. The story of FAT Village is a testament to the transformative power of art and the significance of nurturing an inclusive and collaborative artistic community.

Video narration: Doug McCraw, thoughts about Article 27 UDHR.

Text: Doug McCraw, thoughts about Article 27 UDHR.

FATVillage is a project articulating the cultural values outlined in Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Among these rights are two crucial principles that underscore the importance of cultural engagement and the protection of intellectual creations. The first principle emphasizes everyone's right to participate in the cultural life of their community freely and to enjoy the arts and scientific advancements. The second principle accentuates the right to safeguard the moral and material interests arising from one's artistic and creative endeavors. As property owners Lutz Hofbauer and myself created Fatvillage to rally philanthropic support around sustaining an artist community. Its purpose is to promote the creation, exhibition, curation, research, and education of emerging, contemporary artists. The first principle of article 27th, the right to freely participate in the community's cultural life, is a cornerstone of a vibrant and inclusive society. By facilitating and fostering cultural activities, FAT Village can provide individuals space to express their identities and contribute to the human experience. The second principle, the right to protect moral and material interests stemming from one's intellectual creations, recognizes the delicate balance between cultural participation and intellectual property rights. We strive to generate an art community that is inclusive through having many different programs as well as reinforcing cross-disciplinary collaboration and experimentation. We believe the freedom to participate in cultural life is essential for enriching individuals and communities. FATVillage, shares the ultimate goal of Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which is fostering a community that celebrates creativity, values knowledge, and respects individuals' rights to participate in and contribute to the cultural tapestry of humanity.

Article 28th UDHR: We have the right to social and international order.

"Article 28 speaks to the interconnectedness of human rights and the need for global cooperation as a key to their effective implementation." Paul Rice

Paul Rice (USA) represents article 28. Paul Rice is the Founder & CEO of Fair Trade USA, the leading certifier of Fair Trade products in the U.S. Prior to founding Fair Trade USA, Paul worked for 11 years as a rural development specialist in the mountains of Nicaragua, where he founded and led the country’s first Fair Trade, organic coffee export cooperative. Paul’s rich, first-hand experience over the last 30 years in the fields of sustainable agriculture, grassroots economic development, global supply chain transparency and consumer activation is unique in the certification world. Paul has been named Ethical Corporation’s 2019 Business Leader of the Year and is a four-time winner of Fast Company magazine’s Social Capitalist of the Year. Paul is also the recipient of the prestigious Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH PAUL:

I first connected with Paul Rice via a phone call on my iPhone while he was in California. Paul's life story is truly inspiring. He grew up in Texas, raised by a single mother, and managed to earn enough money to fund his college education at Yale University through his own hard work and determination. Paul's educational journey took him far from home. He began by studying abroad in China and later ventured to Nicaragua, where he embarked on a life-altering experience. Living and working alongside coffee farmers, he gained invaluable insights and learned significant life lessons. This experience became the foundation for the creation of PRODECOOP, which has since become one of the world's largest coffee exporters, leading to his remarkable success. Building upon his achievements, Paul initiated Fair Trade USA, the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to certifying fair trade products in North America. The mission of Fair Trade USA is to promote fair wages, eliminate child labor, ensure safe working conditions, advocate for gender equality, and protect the environment. In doing so, they actively contribute to establishing a more equitable international trade system that respects and upholds the rights and freedoms of individuals. Paul Rice's remarkable journey aligns with the principles outlined in Article 28, which asserts, "I have a right to social and international order." Through his dedication and tireless efforts, he has worked to create a world that is more just and equitable, where individuals' rights and freedoms are valued and preserved.

Video narration: Paul Rice, thoughts about Article 28 UDHR.

Text: Paul Rice, thoughts about Article 28 UDHR.

Article 28 speaks to the interconnectedness of human rights and the need for global cooperation as a key to their effective implementation. Government certainly has primary responsibility for creating the conditions for the realization of human rights within each nation. But the role of civil society, business, consumers, and other stakeholders is crucial. Article 28 resonates deeply to those of us in the Fair-Trade movement. Fair Trade seeks to establish more equitable economic and trading relationships between farmers, workers, industry, and consumers around the world. This alignment with Article 28 reflects our commitment to creating a more just international social order where economic, social, and environmental rights can be realized, including the right to a decent standard of living and the right to work in just and favorable conditions. Fair Trade standards include provisions related to labor rights, fair wages, safe working conditions, the prohibition of child labor, and environmental stewardship – all on a global scale and in line with the spirit of Article 28. Article 28 reflects the broader principles of human rights, social justice, and international cooperation that the Fair Trade movement promotes. Like the rest of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, Article 28 is an inspiration to me personally and a reminder of the interconnectedness of our global struggle for human dignity. As Rev. Martin Luther King said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly."

Article 29th UDHR: We have duties to the community.

"Article 29 inspires me to lead with purpose and to embrace the principles of sustainability and inclusion for all, striving for a future where every individual can freely and fully develop their potential." Cristina Palmaka

Cristina Palmaka (Brazil) represents article 29. President of SAP Latin America and Caribbean. SAP is a German multinational software corporation that provides enterprise resource planning (ERP) software to businesses. With over 30 years of experience in the IT industry, she is recognized for creating inclusive environments that empower diverse teams to excel and achieve remarkable outcomes. At SAP LAC, with over 6,000 employees across Latin America, Cristina harnesses the strength of their diversity to drive business success and social change. She assembles individuals from various races, genders, sexual orientations, and backgrounds to enrich perspectives and make informed decisions influenced by a range of viewpoints. She is a mental health advocate. Cristina has garnered multiple awards and recognition, including being named as one of the top CEOs in Brazil by Forbes Magazine.

ARTIST WILMA BULKIN SIEGEL'S CONVERSATION WITH CRISTINA:

I had the pleasure of meeting Christina Palmaka through a Facetime call while she was in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Christina serves as the President of SAP (Systems, Applications and Products) Latin American and Caribbean division, a prominent German multinational software corporation that specializes in providing enterprise resource planning software to businesses. Their mission is to promote sustainability and ecological responsibility in the business world. Christina's background is rooted in Brazil, where she grew up in a Catholic family that advocated for gender equality. Her family's origins trace back to Poland. During her upbringing, she was instilled with the fundamental principles of recycling and a conservation mindset, values that have stayed with her throughout her life. Her professional journey in the field of information technology (IT) included leadership roles at both Microsoft and Philips, honing her skills and preparing her for a leadership role on the international stage. Beyond her successful career, Christina leads a well-rounded life, sharing it with her husband and daughter. Christina Palmaka exemplifies the principles of Article 29, which underscores our responsibilities to the community. Through her career and personal values, she has demonstrated a commitment to making a positive impact in her community and the wider world, aligning with her family's legacy of promoting equality and sustainability.

Video narration: Cristina Palmaka, thought about Article 29 UDHR.

Text: Cristina Palmaka, thought about Article 29 UDHR.

Article 29 of the Declaration of Human Rights contains a powerful message. It reminds us of what we owe each other. It’s a beautiful tribute to the power of the community. In today’s profoundly complex and fragmented world, this belief is a beacon of hope. It reveals our interconnection, reminding us that no one thrives alone, and that true success is never achieved at the expense or by the exclusion of others. This idea is my guiding star. As a leader and as a parent, I am deeply aware of my immense influence. I am also conscious of my limitations. Creating positive change – much like raising a child – takes a village. Article 29 inspires me to lead with purpose and to embrace the principles of sustainability and inclusion for all, striving for a future where every individual can freely and fully develop their potential. Vamos Juntos

Article 30th UDHR: Nobody can take away our rights.

"For us Article 30 represents a powerful affirmation of the intrinsic equality of all human beings and the need to safeguard their rights at all times." Elizabeth and Devorah

Devorah Sasha and Elizabeth Sanchez Vegas (Venezuela-United Stated) represent article 30. Directors of International Solidarity for Human Rights. They are the founders of ISHR and the organization's President and Executive Director, a non-profit established in Miami, Florida 2008. This organization's mission is to positively promote human rights education through the arts while supporting the United Nations' call to action. This call was first made on December 10, 1948, when the Declaration was created. The Declaration states called upon all Member countries to publicize the text of the Declaration and "to cause it to be disseminated, displayed, read and expounded principally in schools and other educational institutions, without distinction based on the political status of countries or territories."

Voice narration: Elizabeth Sanchez Vegas and Devorah Sasha, thoughts about Article 30 UDHR.

Text: Elizabeth Sanchez Vegas and Devorah Sasha, thoughts about Article 30 UDHR.

In our shared approach, we have explored the universality and indivisibility of human rights, emphasizing how this principle is essential to preserve the intrinsic dignity of every individual, regardless of their origin or social status. For us, Article 30 is more than a legal provision; it represents the promise that no human being can be deprived of their fundamental rights, thus establishing a universal standard of equality and respect. The profound connection between the loss of human rights and dehumanization is another aspect we have addressed in our joint reflections. We consider Article 30 as a vital reminder of the need to preserve humanity itself, not just the specific rights enshrined in the Declaration. The denial of rights implies not only a legal issue but also a threat to the very essence of what it means to be human, something we find unacceptable in any context. In our opinion, Article 30 stands as a shield against any unjustified attempt to deprive people of their rights, even in conflict situations. We firmly believe that this principle contributes to the construction of stable and just societies by establishing clear limits on the deprivation of fundamental rights. This article is not only a crucial component of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights but also a beacon guiding towards a universal respect for humanity. For us Article 30 represents a powerful affirmation of the intrinsic equality of all human beings and the need to safeguard their rights at all times.